Tell Us Something We Don't Know

#7: Below Deck Mediterranean: Captain Sandy

February 02, 2023 Gabriela Tavakoli Bailey & Orly Minazad Season 1 Episode 7
Tell Us Something We Don't Know
#7: Below Deck Mediterranean: Captain Sandy
Show Notes Transcript

Captain Sandy Yawn does more than navigate superyachts as the star of Bravo's Below Deck Mediterranean. She's a skilled leader, trained to maintain order and calm not only at sea, but in life. Her story is one of resilience, hard work, and molding herself into a truly effective leader. She's here to talk about her book, “Be the Calm or Be the Storm,” where she shares stories about overcoming substance and alcohol abuse, and how she went from cleaning boats to running them as one of the few thriving female Captains in the world.

Captain Sandy Yawn's Instagram:  https://instagram.com/captainsandrayawn?igshid=MWI4MTIyMDE=

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Speaker  0:00  

education wise I knew what I was doing was wrong. I knew I was addict alcoholic. I knew once I put that in my body I couldn't predict my behavior. But what didn't click was that thought process. I didn't have a problem stopping drugs and alcohol. I had a problem staying stopped.


Speaker  0:20  

I'm Gabriela Tavakoli Bailey and I've worked in unscripted television as an executive producer and TV executive doing what I love most, storytelling. I'm an extremely curious person and I decided to do this podcast so I can dig in and learn about fascinating people living extraordinary lives. And I called up my very talented friend Orly Minazad, who is a writer and journalist, and together, we are going to learn about people's journeys and provide you with a fun listen and a good time. Welcome to Tell Us Something We Don't Know.


Speaker  0:59  

Our guest today is Captain Sandy Yawn star of Bravo's Below Deck Mediterranean, a reality show about a yacht crew navigating the sea, each other and elite clients. With over three decades of yachting experience under her belt, Captain Sandy is one of the most respected captains and a male dominated industry and her new book Be the Calm or Be The Storm. She shares her personal struggles and how they led her to become an efficient, but compassionate leader. I especially love this quote from John Allen, who is prominent in the maritime industry. And he says of her captain Sandy is a woman who has earned every stripe standing tall at the helm of the super yachts, she steers. What is most astonishing about her story is not just the calm and focused way she leads through crisis, but the way she triumphed over her past and has remained committed to sobriety for more than three decades.


Speaker  1:58  

Nice to have you with us.


Speaker  2:01  

Thank you. Thank you for being here.


Speaker  2:03  

Thank you for having me. Thank you. I'm really grateful to be here.


Speaker  2:06  

When Orly and I were kind of going back and forth and talking about we're going to be recording with you and sharing notes and everything. One thing I think both of us didn't realize is that there are pirates out there.


Speaker  2:19  

I don't know, if we're the only two that didn't realize that.


Speaker  2:25  

And I'm picturing old school cartoon pirates, like with a skull and bone flag and you know,


Speaker  2:31  

yeah, they robbed the ships of the gold, right. So


Speaker  2:36  

in your book, I mean, you have some great stories, and I just love how you weave them in with opening up about yourself, but also the leadership tips and whatnot. But can you share with us like the Most Holy shit pirate story that you experienced? 


Speaker  2:51  

To be honest, everyone thinks it's the red sea story, but it's not. It's the story through windward passage, the pirates in the Red Sea. I knew there were warships out there that were on their way to rescue us. Right. So for me, it's like even if the pirates showed up first the warship was gonna show up. Right after I was navigating between Haiti and Cuba. It's called windward passage. And a lot of boats go that way. Because to go around Hispaniola Island, you're exposed to the Atlantic Ocean. It was really rough. And one more passage, we tow boats that are very expensive. And most pirates at sea are thieves at sea, right? So they're after our little tender, they're not really in that part of the world, going to hijack our boat like they would in other parts of the world. We would notice this target on the radar, we call them targets where you see other boats, and it was going really fast about 32 knots coming towards us and was rough on the other side. I called the Coast Guard on my phone and said, I think a pirate is pursuing our vessel to steal our tender. And the Coast Guard said we've had 90 attempts this month. She's we're on our way. And I knew that there was a Coast Guard station and Cuba. So it really was like okay, we got help here. Calling I'm on my phone didn't alert the pirates that I had called for help. We're told to light up our vessel. So we did and we zigzagged our course and I put the throttle down right so that was for me the scariest time because you're actually active pursuit of your yacht. And when we started to enter into the Caribbean Sea, it was quite rough and they turned around when you have a boat that's pounding into the sea, all the fluids, the oil, the gasoline, the fuel is all moving around. So the sediment is coming up right Right, right as we did that I lost an engine.


Speaker  4:50  

Oh God.


Speaker  4:52  

So now I passed the pirates. They are not coming out that rough. They were in like eight to 10 footsies. And now I lost an engine and I had a deadline. I had to make for the Antigua charter show. And then I'm like, Oh my God. Now we have to go into Dominican Republic to get our engine fixed. We've escaped, we had to reenter. But it wasn't Haiti, right. So Hispaniola Island is very large, which has Dominican Republic. That's where I had to go, Doc. And it was crazy. And we were like, security all night long. But we made it out. And the most intense time to answer your question was one more passage in my life over the fire in the Red Sea.


Speaker  5:36  

So when you said that you alert the pirates that you called for help? How do you alert them?


Speaker  5:42  

So when I had the fire in the Red Sea, I called for help over my VHF radio. And I said, I'm an American citizen sustained a fire, and I'm floating in Yemen territory. Here's my latitude and longitude. I alerted the pirates who are also monitoring that channel, exactly where we were at. We were adrift. It was who gets there. For some reason I wasn't worried about the pirates getting to us first is crazy. Yeah, I we kept thinking about keeping the crew member from jumping overboard, the other crew member from killing the other crew member for pulling the co2. Like I was dealing with crew on board. Yeah, logistics, not thinking about the pirates and the security guy on board during the Red Seas, like the pirates are on the right. And I'm like, when they're off the back of the boat. That's when you can tell me the pirates are here. But until then, I don't wanna hear the pirates are on the way. That's not helping me.


Speaker  6:29  

She's so chill. Like, oh, the pirates are on the way. That's fine. I have shit to do. Yeah, yes, exactly.


Speaker  6:34  

Like you can't be thinking what could be you got to think about what is and deal with that situation, one problem at a time, because trust me, there are a lot of problems.


Speaker  6:44  

And also the way that other people react, right people around you how they're reacting to it, and their fears and whatnot. So it's not just about attacking the situation at hand, which is not letting the pirates get to you, but also how to


Speaker  7:00  

maintain the calm on board because actually, we were in a storm. We were in pirate infested waters were drift off the coast of Yemen. That country was in a civil war. I had crew members who were freaking out trying to jump overboard.


Speaker  7:16  

This is the other story. But yeah, that was the Red Sea. Yeah.


Speaker  7:19  

It's like how do you show up in your situations? Right? Every situation you show up differently? We just do because how we feel about ourselves mentally, physically. How are we centered the Red Sea? For me, I felt very calm. I didn't feel scared. I guess I was scared when we were in the sea. And we were anchored off but during the fire, I didn't feel I acted. I acted on my training. Whereas when I was under way, they were chasing us we were not being chased in the Red Sea. The threat of piracy was there. But after we had gone ashore, that I had 12 crew members plus myself being put in the back of a pickup truck and driven through Hodeidah Yemen. Yeah. That's when I had been fair thinking. I think we're on our way to be held hostage, right. Good news is we were not we were taken to immigration. So you have those moments in life where yes, that fear creeps in. But as their leader, I couldn't show that. I could not show that. In fact, I saw kids carrying machine guns and I just started crying and it wasn't here. It was out of sadness in my heart. And what I saw in their eyes was hopelessness. When I saw on our back of our pickup truck was hope. And I thought that begins with leadership. If the leader has hope your team's gonna have hope.


Speaker  8:41  

You were in Yemen for two weeks and you got sick. I got


Speaker  8:45  

malaria. And I didn't know it crazy, man. Yeah, it's crazy, right? I had no idea.


Speaker  8:50  

So where's the rest of the crew while you're sick with malaria?


Speaker  8:54  

The security guy had he's actually former saps British officer, okay, equivalent to a Navy SEAL. And he suggested I fly everyone else. But him and I and unlike he goes, we're a bigger target. They're 13 People get 12 You know, so I didn't know it's just him and I Oh, wow. It was from brushing my teeth with the water. I think I'm not sure but I got really sick. And once the boat was secured and getting towed away, we drove to Sinawe, which is the capital of Yemen. We flew out of Somalia to Dubai. The minute I landed in Dubai, he's like, do you need doctor? So he took me to the doctor sent me to the pediatrician.


Speaker  9:33  

That was probably the only doctor they can find. And that


Speaker  9:36  

was in the pediatricians office.


Speaker  9:38  

It was kind of funny to get a


Speaker  9:39  

lollipop. They did test my blood right there. I watched him put the samples in. Yeah, it's fun in that thing, and it goes over 500 strands of malaria. Were you were you have one of them. I'm gonna treat you for the most common strands. I didn't have that many. And so I was sick for weeks.


Speaker  9:59  

When you have malaria is that just mean like you're puking and


Speaker  10:03  

I had a bad fever? I was hallucinating. I mean, I had. I was really ill. I was so sick. I could barely walk. The guy had to practically carry me to the car.


Speaker  10:13  

Ah, yeah. So that stories in the book. Exactly.


Speaker  10:19  

My life. Sounds very boring. Now, like after I heard all of this. I'm like,


Speaker  10:25  

it ages you though. I mean, I'm just saying like, every time I'd have something happen at sea. And it's not just about pirates, it's if things break, and you're in the middle of the ocean, and all the drama. Yeah, you know, the crew, they're coming out from their cabins because they're afraid for their lives, you gotta look like you're in control. Yeah. But on the flip side of that there are those days, you take off from the dock, and the sea is calm and flat, and it's a full moon, you see the Milky Way? And? Whoa,


Speaker  10:52  

it's pretty cool.


Speaker  10:54  

What does it mean, exactly? To be a captain,


Speaker  10:57  

I think it's something that you've worked your entire life, and educated yourself on every level of your skill, right? That's required to be a captain. So for me, it's navigation management style. I didn't really take courses on management. My Courses came from living it right. So I thought I have worked for many owners. How do I want to lead my team? So I learned the navigation side, the financial side, and you learn spreadsheets and budgeting and all of that, to be a captain is so much more than just driving a boat. You're running a business? Yeah, I learned that. One of the things you have to master is personalities. When you're in fit mental condition, you can lead others, but until you are, you're not going to do great at leading others if you're not leading yourself first. And my sinnard when I walk out of my cabin, am I taking care of myself mentally and spiritually and physically for me, to be able to lead others and to be a captain, you have to know how to do that so many CEOs of companies just expect you to produce without giving. It's not a give take it's a give give right and a lot of CEOs like I'm paying you now you give me this. It's like you got to do more than just pay someone and go here, go learn this. It's about a flow. And to be a captain. Of course, you have to learn everything you need to learn the skill set, but then there's that other set, that's really something that you must live yourself in order to be able to lead others


Speaker  12:35  

to become a captain, do you have to have like a degree or like


Speaker  12:39  

so you're going to maritime school so you don't have to graduate school? you cannot be a convicted felon. Oh, you have to be able to not have a felony. You can have misdemeanors. Because there are people out there that might be I was one of those. So I went to a school called maritime professional training based in Fort Lauderdale. It cost $1,000 Roughly to get your STC w 95. And I needed a physical from the Coast Guard and a drug test. You can't be on drugs. So basically, once I had that I could go and get a job. Then you it's like an apprenticeship, right? So you start learning is your hands on. Yeah. And you go for your other courses, right? So you go for navigation rules of the road, firefighting, radar, all these forces, the Coast Guard, I'm just going to talk us requires a certain amount of days at sea. So I need sometimes 80 days at sea. So you have to keep track. And a boat has to stamp your book. So you have a book, okay? It's a call to seafarers book. And then you need a passport. And then this is what you get. It is called merchant marine credential. United States of America, essentially, this license is a federal license. Wow. Okay. Isn't that cool? So I'm actually a merchant marine officer for the US government, which entitles me to be able to go and run super yachts. It's all those hours at sea and days at sea that you learn what to do in case something happens. Yeah, yeah. Okay.


 Speaker  14:20  

Did you have a passion for the sea? Or how did you like the first time that you're like, This is what I want to do.


Speaker  14:26  

I grew up on the waterskiing. So my family always had small boats. I love the warmth of Pisces. I never knew their job in yachting ever in my life, until I happen to end up in Fort Lauderdale. Lived in a halfway house because I was getting sober. Kinda like needed a job and started washing boats for a living and then I would see these cruel boats. I'm like, is that a job? Like? Next thing you know, the guy that I was working for offered me a full time job. He taught me he sent me to sea school he sent me to maritime professionals and is unerring class and all this other stuff. So I learned that and then he sold that boat. After nine years, I worked for him. And he taught me navigation and I ran the boat to the Bahamas, I went up to the northeast, I learned how to dock without bow thruster. So that's why people go well, and she talks about so well, because I did it on smaller boats without through and bow thrusters. Then I advanced in my career, that was my path.


Speaker  15:28  

So did he recognize something in you that it doesn't seem like a trivial job to offer somebody,


Speaker  15:33  

it was a work ethic, he saw how hard I worked. Remember? No, I just gotten sober. And I worked really hard. And he admired my attention to detail how hard I worked, and he offered me a job. And I'm grateful. We're still in each other's lives.


Speaker  15:49  

Today, I was going to ask because that's such a sweet way of having your life change, you know, you only need that


Speaker  15:55  

one person that believes in you that can help open a door. And then if you have that drive, I think that you too can be like a captain. So in terms of your sobriety, in your book, you talk about how you were 13 years old when you first had Quaalude. When you look back at that time in your life, and then being sober for so long. Now, did you ever think that you were in a messy situation with it? Or did you just think you were having fun? Like, what was that like for you, when you were experiencing it?


Speaker  16:28  

I think I was just trying to fit in, like, I didn't really fit anywhere. I was doing drugs to that point. And you can not call it peer pressure anymore. Because that's what I grew up with. You didn't call it being influenced. So you have influencers on social media, they're influencing you to buy things, just by their actions, right. So someone getting high, or having a party, or Oh, my gosh, this is amazing. You're being influenced by watching that. And that's what happened to me. There's a girl and I want to share this. You never know who you're impacting by influencing. From your own actions, we influence people on a daily basis, no matter how we show up in life. And this woman, Vicki, drove Paul Allen's boat out of Monaco Boat Show, and I was in all I was like, wow, one day, I want to drive a boat that big. Wow. That's a woman inspired me. So she influenced me through her behavior by driving that boat. And I was like, That woman today had no idea the impact she had on me just by showing up in life and doing her job. So be mindful of that. That's why I'm gonna say to your listeners, be mindful of who you are and how you show up. Because someone's watching and you are influencing someone in your life, or someone watching you that admires you. Yeah, that's a really good point. So that's what happened to me. And then next thing, you know, I was on that drug merry go round. I was like, again, I knew I could. So


Speaker  18:04  

was there anybody that you feel like helped you get sober?


Speaker  18:08  

Everybody that crossed my path that helped me not one person. It was a village, to be honest, like, the student wasn't ready. You know, when they say, when the students ready, the teacher will appear? Yep. In our book, it talks about having a psychic change, right. So education wise, I knew what I was doing was wrong. I knew I was an addict alcoholic. I knew once I put that in my body, I couldn't predict my behavior. But what didn't click was that thought process. I didn't have a problem stopping drugs and alcohol, I had a problem staying stopped. It was when things started going great for me that I started using again, when it was all falling apart. It was easy for me to stop. It wasn't easy for me to stay stop. When I got it all back. The success, I would always sabotage, I had to have that psychic change. There was something inside of me that goes I no longer want to live like this. One day at a time, I'm going to follow their direction in their world. A lot of people don't believe in God. And so the meetings they come up with the meaning of God, good orderly direction, just use that. So I thought, I'm just gonna go in a good orderly direction. And that's really helped me and the people that show up. I have a sponsor, I love her. And we have all this self work, right? So we work on ourselves. And when people say, Oh my God, you're inspiring her amazing leader. Well, I learned all this and nothing's original that comes out of my mouth. I learned that from someone else.


Speaker  19:39  

When you weren't sober. What


Speaker  19:40  

did that look like? Oh, it was a mess.


Speaker  19:43  

Arrest detox, halfway houses three quarter way houses. I had no car I didn't have a driver's license for five years like my life was constant chaos and destruction of myself. You know, meaning like not healthy. Just Have a tornado rolling through life. Yeah, thank God I'm sorry. Thank you God. Like I can't imagine go ever going back to that.


Speaker  20:09  

Do you ever have times though, where you have cravings, or it's like, I don't have a craving,


Speaker  20:13  

but I do go, man, I just wish I could turn the mind off. Yeah. You know how alcohol can do that kind of puts it to sleep. So I have to use exercise. I use music, you find different ways to cope. Yeah. So that's what I do. And it's working. And the book is, all my friends are texting me. And all these people from all over the world are reading it. And they're like, Oh, my God, I love like the feedback. I did an audio version. And I'm trying to, like, it's hard to hear your own voice. Right, right. Right. My friend. Diane goes, Oh, my God and love. I just finished it the audio. It's awesome.


Speaker  20:50  

It's really cool. So I'm writing a book


Speaker  20:53  

is no easy task. I mean, you've been doing it for three years. Yeah. And you had a ghostwriter that was interviewing you daily. That's right. I always wonder about like when you're writing a memoir, or writing anything about your own life? How do you remember the details of the story? Interview?


Speaker  21:11  

We interviewed people my family that remember versions I'm like, I don't remember that. My former crew that I was with for years, right? So when a captain hires their crew, their season you're together for years. They'll leave for a month because they get a month paid holiday, but they always come back.


Speaker  21:30  

Yeah, it's kind of sad the relationships and the bond that you have, like going away on camp or something and you know, about every side of each other and then sometimes you don't talk to the person for years. Is that how it is for you?


Speaker  21:43  

Yes, you know, and I remember when Facebook first started because Robbo check this out, Sandy, we're in the crew mess and Tuscan Sun and Barcelona because I could just poke my friend. I'm like, friend, because yeah, he's in Australia. We were really not hoping. Just give him a beer. I'm like, we're really not giving them a beer Rob. He was, yeah, look, I'm giving him a beer. And I'm like, Well, you're not really giving them a beer. Because it's a big beer. I go okay, fine. You know, you have these moments in the crew mess. And I remember that this other remember, I had ate all the yogurts and the crew were mad. He's like, why is he 20 yogurts in one city? You remember those things? As a captain, you have to go. I know you like yogurt, which there are others that live here. So it's that balance and you just remember their faces and hey, listen, we are in Genoa, Italy. And we are now we're in Barcelona and all my crew were snowboarders. And I go well, let's go snowboarding on a rainy day. I drive us to Endora. And so Dominic and sola may we call her Sally. She was my chef. And he was a engineer. And he taught me how to snowboard and he bought my goggles. And it was cool because you have this bond. And yeah, I would always take me snowboarding. we skied in the Dolomites, like, if it was a rainy day, you have these moments and you've formed that bond. It lasts forever.


Speaker  23:04  

I mean, that's the kind of work environment people dream of, honestly. And it's so hard to find. I have zero boat experience. But if you want to hire me, I'm available.


Speaker  23:15  

We work hard now. Your life is not your own. It's not that glamorous. Trust me.


Speaker  23:20  

I actually meant to ask you because you're on water for so long. How are you one gone for so long? But also how do you stay sane, being with these specific people, like all the time every day? And is it because you're so busy running it that it's


Speaker  23:36  

but when you're around people with character, you build on that. And as a captain, I had a freedom that most crew don't have. So I maintained as much as I could. But you know, I'm later in life now. I've loved my life. And I now I'll just do the show. And if I have a few deliveries, which I'd love to do, I would do that. The gone time now. It's just corporate speaking eyes on leadership. And yeah, that's it. So Leah, do we have great relationship? I don't have any complaints. Like, I don't think she does either. Third, down.


Speaker  24:12  

We have goals. It's good to have goals. Yeah. And how did you guys meet Facebook?


Speaker  24:18  

That funny?


Speaker  24:20  

Did you pok her?


Speaker  24:21  

I didn't/ She actually sent me a message. She came across the show. And she wrote many blessings. And that stuck out to me because I had 1000s of messages. Actually, with my sponsor, I go, I was single for two years. And I'm like, I think I'm ready. She goes ratty list of the person, you know, all the qualities, all of it. So I wrote this list and 30 days later, I decided to check the messages and she had wrote June. And then we met a month after I checked the messages and we knew immediately


Speaker  24:51  

but how did you ask her like, what did you respond? She wrote many blessings. And I said hi,


Speaker  24:56  

no, I was doing this, I believe to her and I wanted singers and on Honestly, like, she has a voice. She's a real singer. She has this gospel. Gospel. Yeah. So she started seeing me and she's like, kicked off the platform, which is sad. Ah, I don't know God loves people that love the same sex. Yeah, I don't understand that. But here we are today. Yeah,


Speaker  25:17  

you write this list of what you want in a woman. And then 30 days later you meet Leah.


Speaker  25:23  

But you know what I left off the list where they lived.


Speaker  25:28  

You have to be specific. And I'm going to tell you a quick story. So I had a list before I met my husband. That was like 2000 pages long. Nadine Rajabi who is the showrunner EP of Below deck. She officiated our wedding.


Speaker  25:45  

And that was her. Yo, she was so good.


Speaker  25:49  

When she was writing her speech and everything. I was telling her about, you know, the list and everything. She's like, Gabby, you got to send me this list. I was like, so embarrassed because I had things like big muscular hands and


Speaker  26:03  

embarrassed about that.


Speaker  26:05  

Yeah. And so at the wedding, she reads the list of all the things, but she wouldn't stop. She would not stop and she just kept going. Up there. I'm holding my husband, James's hands, and I'm just like, Oh, God, Oh, God. Oh, God. So anyway, it works. And you did not put geographically desirable. Yeah. So


Speaker  26:27  

it still worked out. You put enough of it that you know,


Speaker  26:31  

you know, Leah did a vision board. And on that vision board, she put America's Got Talent. Well, guess what Leah got on America's Got Talent. So I said you didn't write you want to win?


Speaker  26:44  

You forgot the most important part. Yeah, well, I


Speaker  26:46  

think for her, it's like she knew she made it right. But the only reason she didn't go back was because it COVID Ah, that's anyway, but they intention and I believe in that. What you think about what you bring about and the cool thing about this book is it's published by Louise Hays company. Louise Hay create a Hay House when I got sober. Everybody in the rooms reading about Louise Hay. What you think about what you bring about your intention? affirmations? That's Louise Hay. Yeah, the fact that I'm a Louise Hay author blows my mind. It's like full circle.


Speaker  27:21  

So between being captain and author, writing your memoir, which one did you just not believe would have ever happened? Honestly, both.


Speaker  27:29  

I didn't have dreams. As a kid. I didn't have that. So I had parents that struggled. They did the best they could I don't blame my parents for anything. Yeah. But I didn't have dreams. I had the dream after I got sober. The dream came to me. Now I have like dreams. You know, now I'm creating a charity to be able to change lives with the platform I've been given and have it continue on, even after I'm no longer here. To continue to to help people. That's a dream. That's amazing.


Speaker  28:02  

For below deck, how did that happen? How did you get on the show? Based on what you're saying? You didn't have a dream to be on a reality show, right?


Speaker  28:11  

No. In fact, Nadine Rajabi. It was her. We had a mutual friend, I guess Monique marvez who is a comedian. And she was with Nadine and said, I know someone Captain Sandy. And she introduced us and Nadine pick the ball up and ran with it. And there was some people who objected to having me or one person felt like it was a man's job. It wasn't a woman's job. And it's the data the boat,


Speaker  28:40  

the male dominated industry, but now you have paved the way.


Speaker  28:44  

Yeah. And you know, Navy was a big part of that. And honestly, like, again, you never know who you're influencing by just showing up and doing what you do best, right, your job or who you are as a human being. And she did that. And she continues to do that. You know, next thing, you know, she went dark. I mean, I thought okay, it wasn't meant to be next thing. You know, I got the call, because she was told to go dark on me, because now it was the next phase. It was a bunch of women that made it happen.


Speaker  29:13  

And that's really cool.


Speaker  29:14  

And just saying that like being on the TV show. The most critical of people that I have are women. It's like I want women to support women. I want women to have each other's back.


Speaker  29:27  

Yeah. All right. So rapid fires. Who is your celebrity doppelganger?


Speaker  29:36  

Mariel Hemingway, I get that a lot. Okay. I also get I wish I could be Charlize Theron.


Speaker  29:42  

Oh, yes. Best gift that Leah ever got you. Her.


Speaker  29:48  

Like you could see it in your eyes and your smile how much you love her? Because that's pretty special. So


Speaker  29:55  

yeah, thank you. biggest pet peeve


Speaker  29:58  

on airplanes when people are not considerate of other people so this person might turn their music on on their phone and, and this guy behind me goes, That's obnoxious. Turn it off. It was like, people were making comments. I just sat there because you know, when you're in the public eye, you're like, not drawing attention to yourself. But I just wanted to go really?


Speaker  30:16  

What's something that happened to you that makes you believe in everything happens for a reason?


Speaker  30:21  

My motorcycle crash, they discovered kidney cancer. Oh my gosh, yeah. So I was doing 70 miles an hour and a motorcycle hit a car T boned it. And they found cancer because I had to have a full body scan.


Speaker  30:35  

full body scan. That's how they found it. Oh, yeah. God. Isn't that incredible?


Speaker  30:40  

I was like, why can you just make it more gentle?


Speaker  30:44  

But you're okay now, right? Yes, I'm


Speaker  30:45  

fine. They removed the cancer. Oh, good.


Speaker  30:48  

Thank God. Good. Good. If you weren't a captain, what would you be? If I wasn't a captain? I wouldn't own a hair salon.


Speaker  30:58  

I wouldn't do hair. Because I'm going on a salon because I love how people the energy in a hair salon. Those five people are always talking good music.


Speaker  31:09  

I would have never guessed that would be your answer. I love that.


Speaker  31:13  

I love that. Yeah.


Speaker  31:13  

Pumpkin Spice Latte. Yay


Speaker  31:15  

or Nay? I like pumpkin. Yeah. All right.


Speaker  31:19  

If you had a superpower, what would it be?


Speaker  31:22  

If I had a superpower? I would be able to fly. Oh, best advice you ever got? Mine my own backyard. My own side of the street. The best advice I ever got.


Speaker  31:35  

Don't stick your nose in other people's business. Don't give unsolicited advice. It carries you far in life.


Speaker  31:43  

That's true. Stay in your lane for sure. Yeah. Okay. You're at karaoke. Pick a


Speaker  31:47  

song. It would be the song called stuck that Leah wrote.


Speaker  31:52  

Ah, gosh. You think Leah will come on real quick and say hello?


Speaker  31:56  

Yes, Leah. Come on up. Come say hi. Come on. Duck,


Speaker  32:06  

when you try to move and your feet won't do what you need them to do. Just like that. Hiccup acts like step


Speaker  32:14  

dead glue. Those are not the word.


Speaker  32:21  

Hi, so this song can you sing a little for us? Or is that just putting you on the spot?


Speaker  32:25  

Oh, yeah,


Speaker  32:26  

that's put me on the spot.


Speaker  32:28  

Here's the last question on a rapid fires. We always like to end with tell us something we don't know. Like about yourself that we would be surprised to hear. So tell us something about Captain Sandy that people wouldn't know.


Speaker  32:41  

Well, she's super playful. Like a huge child at heart. Like people that know her color peed the Peter Pan. Yeah, I don't think they really show her plane as much as she plays here at home. And then Captain Sandy about Leah. She can really sing. Like a really thing


Speaker  32:59  

is not really equipment. She's a mom. And she loves me. Leo's Where's where's everything out there? Everybody knows about Leah.


Speaker  33:10  

pretty open. Yeah,


Speaker  33:12  

we're open. What you see is what you get. Which is great.


Speaker  33:15  

She brings me coffee every


Speaker  33:16  

morning. Ah, you're so lucky. Yeah, she wakes up before me. But I will bring her coffee. But she kept brings me Cafe every morning. She makes it perfectly. Yeah, she teaches


Speaker  33:27  

me to play more because I'm a little more like uptight and can be a little more careful. And she's like, let's just do it. I know. So we're a good balance for each other. Well,


Speaker  33:38  

it was nice meeting you, Leah and Captain Sandy, thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you so much for being on our show. And your book is incredible. And I'm sure that a lot of people are going to be running after it and checking it out. So thank you. Thank you so much for listening to tell us something we don't know. You can find us on Instagram and Twitter at TUSWDK. Or email us at info@tellussomethingwedontknow.com

 Audio and editing by Simon Grefenstette and theme Music provided by signature tracks


Transcribed by https://otter.ai